New Product Development in the Age of IoT

New Product Development in the Age of IoT

If you’re responsible for new product development in your company, you will be familiar with the several steps of that process. Experts mostly separate the new product development process into seven or eight steps, starting with idea generation and finishing with a post launch review. The fact that more and more things become smart; i.e. they either feature some intelligence or they are connected and controlled through the IoT, has significant implications on new product development, particularly on its very first phases. Traditionally, ideation and screening of first product ideas have focused on research, brainstorming, SWOT analysis, market and consumer trends, and so forth. All these activities imply certain hypotheses and more or less tangible perceptions of products or product components. This works fine, as long as the final product is a one-way product; i.e. once produced and sold it won’t change (other than to age and break, ultimately). However, smart things aren’t on-directional, but bi-directional: they communicate, they change, and therefore their effects on consumers are far more complex and variable than those of their „dumb“ predecessors. The smarter a thing, or a group of things, is, the more complex the situations they will create for their environment and […]

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Know And Speak To Your Customer Through The IoT

Know And Speak To Your Customer Through The IoT

Equipped with sensors and microchips, ever more of objects can communicate, with each other and with human beings – the Internet of Things and Humans is born. Even washing powder is set to become smart through attached sensors on its packaging that detects when the product is being used, and that communicates with readers like smartphones when scanned. From today’s 5 billion to 21 billion by 2020, the number of wirelessly connected things will increase.  Who will profit from the Internet of Things – or IoT – most? Let’s look at the obvious applications, first: Stock-keeping and supply-chain management processes will have implemented technologies making objects communicating with each other, thus enabling businesses to follow the progress of their products from factories to shops to end-consumers. Espresso beans will tell baristas about the best temperature to keep them in stock. Batteries will inform their owners when reaching the last phase of their power-providing lives. From our perspective, however, the biggest potential lies in customer relations. Brands are realizing that the best way to sell their products is to build personal relations with customers rather than to spend lavishly on marketing. Until today, many brands come only second behind retailers with […]

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