UN’s World Food Programme WFP Appoints Baltic Data Science As Partner In Building Blocks Project

Our subsidiary Baltic Data Science (“BDS”) has formally been appointed by WFP to support them on the scale-up of the Building Blocks project.

We are very proud to announce that our close development partner and Polish associated company BDS has formally been appointed by the World Food Programme for the further roll-out the existing Building Blocks platform. At the beginning of the this year, we together with our partner BDS started to build a blockchain-based proof-of-concept for WFP and transformed it into a fully-functional blockchain-based transaction platform in Jordan. The inhabitants receive food vouchers that can be used in the village’s supermarket.

So what are the benefits compared to traditional transaction payments? Thanks to the blockchain technology, our innovative system provides higher transparency of aid accounts for beneficiaries and easy tracking of transaction which helps to lower the effort of bookkeeping for vendors and WFP. The biggest, however invisible, advantage is a minimized risk of fraud or data mismanagement.

We are excited to follow the next phase scale-up of the transaction platform and want to thank WFP for their trust and wish both partners a successful roll-out.

If you want to learn more about our services or specifically this project, please contact us at info@datarella.com or BDS at info@balticdatascience.com.

About WFP:
The United Nations World Food Programme “WFP”, with its headquarters located in Rome, Italy is the world’s largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide. WFP is mandated to deliver the food necessary to save the lives of victims of natural disasters, wars, and civil unrest. On average, WFP reaches more than 80 million people with food assistance in 75 countries each year. About 11,500 people work for the organization, most of them in remote areas, directly serving the hungry poor. WFP is part of the United Nations (UN) System.

About BDS:
Headquartered in Gdansk, Poland, BDS is an international data science and blockchain development company specializing in business-focused solutions. BDS develops data-driven applications (mobile/desktop frontends and backends) for international customers as well as blockchain-based applications.

 

IOTA Hackathon

The blockchain tech sphere in the fall of 2017 looks totally different than in the same period of 2016. Then, many people heard about blockchain for the very first time, now there are several dedicated blockchain platforms for specific applications. In the field of Industry 4.0, beside supply chain and robotics, IoT applications provide a hotbed for highly scalable blockchains, such as IOTA, NEO, or QTUM.

For and with one of these IoT-specific blockchains, IOTA, we will organize a hackathon, a week-end full of code, co-creation and ideas.

BUILD THE FUTURE WITH US!

Today is blockchain, tomorrow is industry 4.0 and the internet of everything. Autonomous cars, sensors and intelligent factories are the future but how will they communicate and transact among one another on a worldwide scale? IOTA is a blockless ledger system which enables scalable autonomous machine to machine micro-transactions without fees. Want to get your hands dirty and take part in building the future?

WHAT’S THE IOTA HACKATHON ALL ABOUT?

  • Developing services or products for the internet of things
  • Gaining experience with IOTA’s blockless ledger system for cutting-edge machine to machine transactions
  • Keynote speeches by key players in the industry
  • Networking, fun, free food and friendly competition

THREADS TO BE PURSUED

  • IoT Based Business Plans
  • Hardware Connectivity Layer: Bluetooth, Z-wave, ZigBee or LoRa
  • Application Layer: MQTT, XMPP
  • Fog, Mist & Edge Computing for IoT
  • Quantum security
  • IoT Maintenance & Lifecycle Management
  • Identity of Things (IDoT)

WHO CAN PARTICIPATE?

  • Developers (Esp. JavaScript, Java, Python)
  • Business Practitioners & Economists
  • UI/UX Designers

SCHEDULE

FRIDAY 17 NOV
18:00 – 19:00
Reception and Networking: Get comfortable and get to know one another

19:00 – 21:30
Keynote Presentations: Introductions and food for thought
– Jörg Blumtritt (Datarella)
– Dominik Schiener (IOTA)

SATURDAY 18 NOV
9:00 – 9:30
Breakfast and Coffee: Fuel up for the Hackathon

9:30 – 10:15
Individual Introductions: Barcamp style three keywords per person
30 Second Elevator Pitches: Explain your idea, build a team that can execute it!

10:15 – 11:00
Team Building: Chat with team leaders of interest & decide which team you want to hack with.

11:00 – 12:00
Speakers round: Getting started with IOTA: Dev Tools & Resources from Baltic Data Science

12:30 – 13:30
Lunch Break: Enjoy some delicious food and get ready

13:30 – 16:30
Time to Hack: Build, Test, Iterate

16:30 – 16:45
Movement Break: Get your blood pumping!

16:45 – 19:30
Time to Hack: Build, Test, Iterate

19:30 – 20:30
Dinner Break: Take some time to nourish the body and get ready for the all nighter to come!

20:30 – Late
Hack Till Your Heart’s Content: It’s up to you. The accelerator is open all night. Code till you drop.

SUNDAY 19 NOV
9:00 – 9:30
Breakfast and Coffee: Fuel up for the final day

9:30 – 12:30
Hacking and Presentation Prep: Get your demos running!

12:30 – 13:30
Lunch Break: Nutrition for the final stretch

13:30 – 14:00
One Last Check: Audio Visual and Tech Check for Demos

14:00 – 16:30
Demo Presentations: Show us what you’re made of!

16:30 – 17:30
Jury Session: Enjoy some refreshments while the jury deliberates

17:30 – 20:30
Awards Ceremony: Celebrate with the winners, network and celebrate

APPLICATION
To apply for the IOTA HACKATHON 2017 register now!
Don’t wait for too long – the number of participants is limited.

LOCATION
Lęborska 3b, 80-386 Gdańsk
NIP: 583-290-74-40

Based on our experiences with hackathons we think that Gdansk, Poland, is a perfectly suited location for this IOTA hackathon. Looking forward to hacking with you!

Blockchain Meetup 9: Blockchain, Quo Vadis?

Rob Habermeier

On blocks, tangles and meta-chains – what is the next step for Blockchain?

This time, we will return to the more technical aspects of blockchain: what is the actual state of different platforms, what’s going on with Bitcoin, IOTA, etc., and where does this all lead us to?

In the first talk, Datarella CEO Joerg Blumtritt will provide us with an outlook, especially on the following aspects:

Continue reading “Blockchain Meetup 9: Blockchain, Quo Vadis?”

An Incentive Scheme For The Blockchain Ecosystem – Supporting The Crowdstart Capital Token Sale

We at Datarella are strong believers in blockchain technology. We have been working on blockchain projects since 2015 – with leading índustry players and organisations. Since we are platform-agnostic, we have worked with Bitcoin, Ethereum, Hyperledger, IOTA, and other blockchains.

One key takeaway of two years of blockchain experience is, that – in the fall of 2017 – most blockchains are still quite immature and a lot of work has to be done in order to make them industry-ready. We see a huge demand for development and investment in not only blockchain-related projects but also in the core blockchain protocols. The key development challenges in 2018 will be to significantly improve the scalability, the stability and the security of blockchain platforms.

As digital organisms fed by communities of developers, blockchain protocols evolve through changes in their code, i.e. either by changes to the original code or through adding a new microorganism – a side chain – by forking the original chain. Both, changes to the original code and forks, could be combined by creating a forkless blockchain with specific rules in the protocol that are created by other rules (see: the Nomic game ). This way, forks would not be needed anymore since rules could be changeable by other rules.

Most industry blockchain projects are developed using side chains. First, that’s to eschew the disadvantages of public blockchains, s.a. PoW, and then, it’s because of the lack of industry-grade conditions in public blockchains. Most, if not all, industry-led blockchain project teams would love to use public chains if they could be used in a reliable way.

Tragedy Of The Commons

That said, strong evolutionary processes in blockchains are needed. But, where’s the incentive for developers to invest resources into the core protocols? The only way to benefit from working on core blockchain protocols is mining tokens and profit from a potential increase in value or joining on elf the blockchain’s foundations and getting paid by them. This imbalance of having no incentive to work on a core technology which everybody would like to see well developed is called the tragedy of the commons: the economic reward for a developer improving blockchain technology is low.

Funding work on core blockchain protocols and thereby the creation of incentives for developers could be provided by private institutions, s.a. Venture Capital (VC) firms, and by public funding, e.g. through a public crowdfunding initiative: the Ethereum foundation could sell Ether through a crowdsale to the developer community working on a specific update in Ethereum’s evolutionary process. For the blockchain’s foundations that would be straightforward thinking.

VCs, however, would have to make sure that their assets, i.e. portfolio companies, profit from an investment in the core blockchain protocol. This could be done indirectly, if blockchain projects don’t need to develop certain functionalities which are already woven in the core protocol, and therefore minimize their efforts and streamline their roadmaps to exit. It can be questioned if that’s an adequate benefit from the VC‘s perspective.

Crowdstart Capital dedicates tokens to the blockchain developer community

With our sister company Crowdstart Capital (CSC) we are planning to address the funding challenge described above. Crowdstart Capital’s goal is to foster blockchain core technologies and applications. CSC wants to contribute to helping blockchain evolve into an enterprise-ready technology. In order to lay a basis for a cryptoeconomic incentive scheme to support the development of blockchain-related projects and to provide incentives to developers to dedicate their work to blockchain‘s core protocols, XSC tokens will be dedicated to the active blockchain community.

Developers committing code to key blockchain projects can opt in to receive XSC tokens for every line of code that is accepted for the respective projects. CSC will set up a smart-contract-based system that will pay out the tokens according to the commits. This incentive is meant as CSC’s contribution to the blockcahin developer community – there will be no further obligations, i.e. CSC does not demand any return for this.

Technologies to be supported by these incentives include the core protocols of leading blockchains, s.a. Ethereum. Also, all projects that participate in the CSC acceleration program are supported. In a second phase it is planned, that members of the community will be able to suggest projects to be included in the incentive scheme. Which project should be included will be voted for by the community in token-based ballots.

We know that we won‘t achieve our goal over night. And we know that we might adapt our plan when necessary. Finally, the most important factor is the blockchain community itself. If we can successfully motivate blockchain developers to join the scheme, to use the XSC tokens and to spread the word to their respective communities – then we can potentially crowdstart something new: an efficient incentive scheme for the evolution of blockchain technology.

“Traditional VCs Are Dead”: Full House at The State Of The ICO Ethereum Meetup

“I can honestly say my industry is being disrupted beyond belief right now. The funny thing is, I like it”, said Jamie Burke during yesterday’s Ethereum Munich meetup “The State of the ICO”. Jamie is betting his Outlier Venture’s fund on the idea to launch a handful, large ICOs to invest in communities and therefore in economies, rather than in startups.

Jamie’s fireside chat (no, there was no fire but it was hot as hell) with Datarella’s founders Michael Reuter and Joerg Blumtritt was a fascinating tour de force towards a potential next level of venture investing in general, and a new breed of investors focusing on communitarian, anti-fragile investments rather than amassing a portfolio of companies of which 90% will fail.

Before, lawyers Dr. Nina-Luisa Siedler of DWF and Dr. Markus Kaulartz of CMS inspired the audience with their highly informative and at the same time very sympathetic presentation on the legal aspects of ICOs. Both being long-time experts in the field of blockchain, managed to entertain everybody although their messages were far from being easy-going. Especially their slide “Consequences in case of incompliance” filled the room with enthusiasm. Their complete slidedeck “Legal Aspects of ICOs” can be downloaded here.

Again, the Ethereum meetup was a great success: everybody learned a lot, and from what we overheard on the floor, some of the individual conversations until late at night resulted in new ideas for …. future ICOs.

Blockchain Meetup 8: The State of the Initial Coin Offering ICO

Jamie Burke

ICOs are all the rage in the blockchain sphere, these days. Tales of hitherto unknown projects selling their tokens and raising millions of US-Dollars within hours or even minutes have made it to mainstream media. With the traditional Venture Capital VC model, another industry seems to be ready for disruption.

In the past 12 months, blockchain-related projects have raised 2.4 times more from ICOs than venture capital firms and early-stage investors.

Funds raised by blockchain-related organizations in the last 12 months

In this meetup, we will approach the ICO from different perspectives, trying to get hold of this phenomenon:

Continue reading “Blockchain Meetup 8: The State of the Initial Coin Offering ICO”

CodeLegit Conducts First Blockchain-based Smart Contract Arbitration Proceeding

No, code is not law. We discussed that before. But, code is used everywhere and somehow it must allude to law. But how, given that no software is bug-free? With our Datarella project CodeLegit, we have been working on a solution bridging the gap between code and law: Today we announce the successful conduct of the worldwide first arbitration proceeding using Smart Contracts on a Blockchain.

For this showcase we used a very simple setting: Two parties agree on doing business that is defined in a Smart Contract. This Smart Contract includes our Arbitration Library. In parallel, both parties conclude a legal contract which includes a arbitration clause referencing the Blockchain Arbitration Rules.

Arbitration Library
Our Smart Contract Arbitration Library allows to pause, resume, modify and end a Smart Contract. Additionally, the Arbitration Library connects the software with human beings acting as Arbitrators. Most of the process is automated, which maximizes the efficiency of a dispute.
Blockchain Arbitration Rules

The Blockchain Arbitration Rules are rules the parties have agreed upon in their legal contract. They shall apply in case of a dispute. Those rules are based on the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules and have been developed by us in cooperation with IT lawyer and Blockchain expert Dr. Markus Kaulartz. The advantages of the rules are, on one hand, speed, because they are tailored to working together with the Arbitration Library and all communication is done via e-mail or any other form of electronic communication and secured via hashes written in the Bitcoin and the public Ethereum Blockchain. On the other hand, the Blockchain Arbitration Rules shall attract arbitrators who are specialists both in legal and technical questions.

Mock arbitral proceeding
In our example, one party which considers the other party to be in a breach of the legal contract pauses the execution of the Smart Contract by triggering a function pauseAndSendToArbitrator in the Arbitration Library. This function automatically notifies a so-called Appointing Authority defined in the Blockchain Arbitration Rules. The Appointing Authority then proposes an Arbitrator who reviews the statements of claim and defence, decides upon the case and finally delivers his arbiter award to the parties. According to the award, the Appointing Authority either resumes the Smart Contract, modifies its execution or ends it permanently, depending on the resolution. The arbitrator is paid with funds available in the Smart Contract in dispute.
Advantages

The integration of decisions by human beings – the arbitration, known from the offline world – transforms a false performance based on an erroneous piece of software – the Smart Contract – into a legally correct performance. At the same time, this kind of arbitration preserves all the advantages of Smart Contracts, because a dispute does not have to be brought before a state court, but can be solved by an expert arbitrator by modifying the performance.

With this arbitration solution, CodeLegit demonstrates a feasible way how to reach compliance in case of erroneous software (do not forget: the more complex software is, the more bugs it contains). The next step will be to implement this solution into industrial Blockchain environments in order to establish the CodeLegit Arbitration Library on a broad basis in the technical compliance sphere.

You can only win by including the Arbitration Library and the Arbitration Rules, because both only apply in case of a dispute, and you will be glad having used them, avoiding going to a state court, but having reached a decision in accordance with applicable laws and through a legitimated court. Give our regards to TheDAO…

CodeLegit Blockchain Arbitration White Paper

The State Of The Initial Coin Offering ICO

In our upcoming Ethereum Meetup we will discuss one of the hottest topics you can read about in the tech space: Initial Coin Offerings ICO, sometimes referred to as Initial Token Offerings ITOs or, more simply, as Token Sales.

In June 2017, blockchain project teams have raised more money through ICOs than through traditional venture capital firms. Has one of the key aspects of applied blockchains – the elimination of the middle-man – unexpectedly come upon the venture capital industry?

It might be too early to confirm this assumption but some VCs have supposedly decided not to wait any longer but to start using ICOs as an instrument to leverage their traditional businesses. Over at CrowdstartCapital, we have compiled a list of the world’s largest ICOs.

Jamie Burke, Dr. Nina Luise Siedler, Dr. Markus Kaulartz

In our meetup, we will approach the ICO from different perspectives, trying to get hold of this phenomenon:

  • Is an ICO the right moneyraising tool for your project?
  • What are the pitfalls of an ICO?

We are very happy to have one of the most prolific experts in the field of blockchain investing to present his perspective on ICOs: Jamie Burke, Founder and CEO of Outlier Ventures and Convergence VC. Jamie and bis team have analysed over 1,000 blockchain-related startups. He is quite critical when it comes to ICOs, That’s the reason we are very much looking forward to meeting Jamie on 25 July.

Right after Jamie introduced us to the actual ICO sphere, we are happy to have Dr. Nina Luise Siedler and Dr. Markus Kaulartz with their interactive take on the legal aspects of ICOs. Everybody has heard of Bitcoin and other crypographic coins or tokens, and most of us know what those are from a technical perspective. Markus and Nina will go beyond that and will explain what tokens are under applicable laws. They will give some practical insights to explain that there are different kinds of tokens which can be used for various business purposes. Depending on the kind of token, different regulatory frameworks apply to ICOs. Markus and Nina will share insights of what companies have to consider when running their own ICO.

We are very much looking forward to having exciting discussions! See you at our partner Deloitte’s  Munich offices on July, 25!

Blockchain Meetup 7: Building Blocks – A blockchain-based Payment and Accounting Solution for the United Nations‘ WFP

WFP Building Blocks

Together with a team of the World Food Program WFP, the Datarella team will showcase the Building Blocks project. And where to better discuss this exciting project than in WFP’s office in the heart of Munich?

What started with a Proof-of-Concept in Pakistan in early January this year, has been transformed in a fully functional Blockchain pilot being rolled out in Jordan in May, 2017. The Building Blocks project not only demonstrates the power and the impact of blockchain technology enhancing to potentially enhance the lives of millions but it is proof of the efficiency of a humanitarian agency, such as WFP.

Continue reading “Blockchain Meetup 7: Building Blocks – A blockchain-based Payment and Accounting Solution for the United Nations‘ WFP”

Medication Plans on The Blockchain – Building a Decentralised Application in Healthcare

The theme of this post is easily generalised to other use cases and serves as an example of how blockchain technology can shift power and trust in a well-established system, in this case the one of health care.

TL;DR

Medical prescriptions should be unified and digitalised. They should be resilient and controlled by the real owner of the prescription (and thus of the personal data). This can be achieved by a blockchain-based solution. A system of smart contracts in Solidity is proposed which achieves this and furthermore is modular and update-able. Some general advice on designing a blockchain solution is given.

What’s the problem?

How many of you know what iatrogenic illness means? I confess that prior to writing my Master thesis upon which this post is based, I also had no idea. So, to not keep you waiting, here’s the definition from Merriam-Webster:

ioatrogenic: induced inadvertently by a physician or surgeon or by medical treatment or diagnostic procedures

from the Greek word for physician (iatros). Add an illness to that and you have an illness caused by a physician. Now, it sounds like an oxymoron, but it is in fact more common than we would of course like to be. You can divide the causes for iatrogenic illness into so-called Adverse Drug Events (ADE) and, to be completely MECE*, other reasons. Other reasons would include things such as rough examinations, surgical errors (there’s a reason they draw arrows on the limb to be amputated) and so on. ADE includes all injuries or complications caused be medication, be it the wrong medication, drugs interacting in unintended ways and so on. [1] ADE has shown to be the most common cause of injury to hospitalised patients, and furthermore, the most preventable one.

Where is the problem coming from?

In fact, computer-based prescribing systems have been shown to decrease medication errors by 55% to 80% in a study from 2004. [2] It does not, however guarantee that the most severe of those medication errors are prevented by the usage of an IT solution. Among ADE’s, the most common form of avoidable medication errors are prescribing errors (i.e. an error made somewhere in the process of getting a drug to a patient). There is a list of sixteen classes of these prescribing errors, but basically they boil down to:

  • Knowledge deficiencies – among doctors, patients or pharmacist about drugs, other parties, et c.
  • Mistakes or memory lapses – e.g. a patient forgets what medication he/she is already on
  • Name-related errors – complicated-sounding substance gets mistaken for other complicated-sounding substance
  • Transferring errors – information is missing or incorrect once the order arrives at the pharmacist
  • ID checks – patient, doctor or pharmacist ID isn’t properly verified
  • Illegible handwriting (!)
  • Wrong type of document filled out

These errors all illustrate why prescribing errors are so common, but also why they should, to a large extent, be avoidable. [3] The thing is that, considering the current rate of prescribing errors causing damage or danger to patients being relatively low (ca. 2% [2]), its importance is overshadowed by more clinical research in medicine and is thus being overlooked by the research community and public in general. One reason for this could be the wide-ranging competencies required to implement a system for decreasing the rate of prescribing errors to zero. To do such a thing, one would require technical expertise within security and privacy as well as all the various skills for application development, one would also require medical and pharmacological knowledge, and essentially, one would need to have experience within information systems management.

A step in the right (digital) direction

To combat prescribing errors, many public health systems require or recommend that patients with more than three different prescribed medications have a unified medication plan which should theoretically contain all prescriptions. The effectiveness and quality of medication plans was examined in 2015 by a group of German researchers. The results were scary. 6.5% of all medication plans examined did not contain discrepancies! Where discrepancies means differences in drug names, additional or missing drugs, deviations in dosage, et c. In spite of this, or perhaps to improve the quality of medication plans, a law was passed in Germany three months after the publication of the medication plan review, which makes it mandatory for all patients with three or more medications to have a medication plan. In order to cope with the slowness of technology adoption in healthcare, up until January 2018, there is no requirement that the medication plans should be digital. Thereafter they should be available on an electronic health card (eGK). [4]

Considering the different types of prescribing errors we’ve identified, it is not difficult to translate those into some type of requirements for a system to solve those errors. The resulting requirements happen to fit very well to a blockchain system with smart contracts, therefore we’ll propose a design of a system of smart contracts to function as medication plan. Let’s look at the errors one by one and explain which requirements fit to them:

Knowledge deficiencies

To resolve this error, data regarding patients and their medications needs to be unified, available and guaranteed correct. There shouldn’t be multiple versions with equal or uncertain amounts of validity. Additionally, there should be little chance of the data getting lost or not available when it is needed.

Mistakes or memory lapses

It is completely human and expectable that a patient taking many different medication can’t remember the details of complicated names of each substance. This can be solved, however, by the unification of medication plans and assurance that all prescriptions are correct and active.

Name-related errors

See point Knowledge deficiencies.

Transferring errors

Through the unification of the various systems available currently, the process of transferring prescriptions would be simplified.

ID checks

Through the digitalisation and implementation of a permissions management system patients would only need some type of identification (could be biometric) to collect their medication.

Illegible handwriting

Assuming the doctor enters the prescription into a digital system and doesn’t write with pen and paper, this problem is practically eliminated.

Wrong type of document filled out

Again, through the unification of the different possibilities to prescribe a medication, there would be no such things as the wrong type of document. At least not inside the system.

Design choices in the solution

So what are the technical details one needs to consider when designing a blockchain-based system for a medication plan? I’ll describe the three most important design choices in this blog post. The three questions are:

  • Who needs to participate in the network?

In this case, the only users are doctors, patients and pharmacies. So to not take on additional risk regarding data exposure, only those who are on-boarded and verified through some separate process should be allowed to participate in the network. There are however some negative aspects of choosing a private or permissioned blockchain, one point being that there might not be enough active nodes to keep the consensus building at an acceptable fault-tolerance level at all times. This can be solve by some type of incentive or requirement that for example doctors keep a running node at all times. Another risk of running a private blockchain is that, when the amount of nodes isn’t very large, and the users consists of a specific group of people (such as doctors in Germany), then the risk of collusion becomes considerable. To combat this, the consensus-making should be well-spread geographically and demographically.

  • What data and functions need to be on the blockchain and what should definitely not be there?

In the case of a medication plan, the data which is required to be on the blockchain consists of three parts; user IDs, prescriptions and doctor/pharmacy permissions to prescribe/sell medications. Naturally, we can’t have plaintext information about patients and their prescriptions, even if it is a private network. Therefore, IDs are formed from a public/private key-pair (similar to bitcoin or ethereum), which should be generated by the user, on a user device. Prescriptions are only ever published on the blockchain as hashes, because even though the users theoretically are anonymous, it has been shown that Bitcoin transactions can be traced back to a person. [5] The permissions of doctors and pharmacies also need to be stored on the blockchain, in a smart contract to ensure that they aren’t manipulated or somehow overruled. Including permissions and sensitive data in smart contract means that extreme caution needs to be taken when programming them, to ensure that no syntactic or logical mistakes are made. The functionality needed on the blockchain is basically complimentary to the data pieces, getters and setters. But additionally, permissions needs to be handled on-chain.

    • How should the smart contracts be written?

There are relatively few resources by experienced smart contracts developers on best practices for building smart contracts, but mostly the general advice for writing good code (failing loudly and as early as possible, commenting, etc.) should be followed. There is however, so much to say about specific smart contract programming that it will be more explained in another blog post. Here, I’ll just talk about architecture of the system of smart contracts briefly.

In order to be able to keep an overview of the smart contracts and functionality used in the application, they should be as small and simple as possible, thus facilitating analysis. Ok, so say that you have a fairly complicated (not in a computational way) functionality to begin with, then you separate it into multiple smart contracts and end up with maybe five to ten of them. How are you supposed to keep track of them and increase the modularity of you system? Enter the contract managing contract. [6] It is basically a contract to keep track of (and manage) the different contracts in your system, it logs the addresses and names of each separate contract and provides another contract, the endpoint of the user-facing application, with the possibility to access them.

Conclusion

Designing an application for managing sensitive personal information needs to be resistant to failure, privacy-preserving and provide accountability so that any changes to the information can be traced. A very relevant use case for such an application is a medication plan. A suitable system for building the application back-end, is a blockchain-based system of smart contracts. Smart contracts programming is a fairly new phenomenon and is based on decentralisation, therefore much thought should be given to how such a system should be designed. A possible solution was drafted above.

*MECE stands for Mutually Exclusive, Collectively Exhaustive

References

1. Tierney LM. Iatrogenic Illness. Western Journal of Medicine. 1989;151(5):536-541.
2. The Epidemiology of Prescribing Errors, The Potential Impact of Computerized Prescriber Order Entry. Anne Bobb; Kristine Gleason; Marla Husch; et al, Arch Intern Med. 2004;164(7):785-792. doi:10.1001/archinte.164.7.785
3. Prescription errors in the National Health Services, time to change practice,
Hamid, Harper and Cushley et al., Scottish Medical Journal. Vol 61, issue 1, pp. 1-6. 21.04.2016
4. Full legal text available at: http://www.bgbl.de/xaver/bgbl/start.xav?startbk=Bundesanzeiger_BGBl&jumpTo=bgbl115s2408.pdf
5. Deanonymisation of Clients in Bitcoin P2P Network. Alex Biryukov, Dmitry Khovratovic, Ivan Pustogarov. Proceeding
CCS ’14, Proceedings of the 2014 ACM SIGSAC Conference on Computer and Communications Security, Pages 15-29, November 03 – 07, 2014
6. Monax – Solidity tutorials, https://monax.io/docs/solidity/solidity_1_the_five_types_model/, Accessed on 15/05/2017.