My AlgorithmicMe: Our representation in data

Talk at Strata + Hadoop World Conference 2016, San Jose, Ca. Today, algorithms predict our preferences, interests, and even future actions—recommendation engines, search, and advertising targeting are the most common applications. With data collected on mobile devices and the Internet of Things, these user profiles become algorithmic representations of our identities, which can supplement—or even replace—traditional social research by providing deep insight into people’s personalities. We can also use such data-based representations of ourselves to build intelligent agents who can act in the digital realm on our behalf: the AlgorithmicMe. These algorithms must make value judgments, decisions on methods, or presets of the program’s parameters—choices made on how to deal with tasks according to social, cultural, or legal rules or personal persuasion—but this raises important questions about the transparency of these algorithms, including our ability (or lack thereof) to change or affect the way an algorithm views us. Using key examples, Joerg Blumtritt and Majken Sander outline some of these value judgements, discuss their consequences, and present possible solutions, including algorithm audits and standardized specifications, but also more visionary concepts like an AlgorithmicMe, a data ethics oath, and algorithm angels that could raise awareness and guide developers in building their […]

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Algorithm ethics: The inevitable subjective judgements in analytics

Here is the video of the talk on subjectivity and ethics in data science methods, that Majken Sander and I gave at Strata+Hadoop World Conference 2015 in London (Courtesy O’Reilly Media, Inc.). The Strata + Hadoop World 2015 in London Complete Video Compilation is also available at O’Reilly’s – and highly recommended.

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Our Flipboard on Wearable Tech is now on the Web, too.

Our Flipboard on Wearable Tech is now on the Web, too.

Great news! Flipboard has made its service available on the web. You can now browse our curated news on wearable tech, smartwatches, The Quantified Self, and the Internet of Things in your browser, too: flipboard.com/qs-socially-relevant-technology

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Slow Data

Slow Data

Data is the new media. Thus the postulates of our Slow Media Manifesto should be applicable on Big Data, too. Slow Data in this sense is meaningful data, relevant for society, driving creativity and scientific thinking. Slow Data is beautiful data. Read my new text „From Slow Media to Slow Data“ at http://beautifuldata.net

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Data is the new media

Data is the new media

Data storytelling, data journalism, and even data fiction – since the advent of Big Data, we find data more and more as tool of narratives. With pattern recognition, exploratory data analytics, and especially with data visualization, data has re-centered from the quantitative to the qualitative. More and more applications support us in using data to tell a story. Dashboards like Tableau or DataLion plug into our data sources and translate the numbers into a visual format that can be much more easily digested. Even highly multivariate data can deliver straightforward meaning to us when we use tools like Gephi, or say, the notorious Palantir. These tools also make social media analytics and text mining feasible techniques to research society, advertising, and markets. Data driven storytelling has conquered most non-fiction publication. News publishers like New York Times or The Guardian employ huge teams of infographic specialists to enrich their reports with meaningful data visualization. Some of their editors have put together awesome collections of beautiful examples, e.g. informationisbeautiful.net. Our most personal data however is generated on our mobile and wearable devices. On our smartphones, wristbands, or smartwatches, some twenty sensors continuously track our behavior and our actions. There is a plenitude […]

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Second Screen

Second Screen

In the US, smartphone and tablet displays have replaced the TV set as screen number one. Meanwhile, not only the time spent on mobile devices has become longer on mobile than on the tube -primarily the intensity of using mobiles, the attention, people dedicate to mobile content, is higher. Smartphones and tablets have thus become the first screen. Nevertheless, there are plenty of occasions, when a smartphone is out of place, or even annoying: At the table, during a lively conversation, or while driving a car, to name just three obvious examples. My twitter friend Jürgen Geuter has put it in one sentence, why smartwatches will the remedy here: To check the wrist watch is socially accepted. Completely within the common boundaries we may just look on our smartwatch if the awaited reply on Whatsapp has arrived, just as we would have consulted the watch to get the time. Likewise, smartwatches are handy in the sense of the word, when we drive a car, and in combination with speech recognition many smartphone apps will work even better than the hands-free kit. Smartwatches will thus become the second screen, the companion of our smartphones. Also therefore they will find their buyers.

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„Analyze Smartphone Sensor Data with R“ – Blog post in reply to our „Call for Data Fiction“

„Analyze Smartphone Sensor Data with R“ – Blog post in reply to our „Call for Data Fiction“

As reply to our „Call for Data Fiction“, Benedikt Koehler has applied the BreakoutDetection packege for R on our sample data set. Here you see his findings with the code: http://beautifuldata.net

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We are the content!

We are the content!

Since 1967 the Consumer Electronics Show CES in Las Vegas has been the display for the latest products in electronic entertainment. Every first week in Januar the big brands disclose their secret products, that will be stacked on the shelves – or rather: put on the online shops. Until recently, CES was the home match for the classic industry: Hifi, TV sets, car radio, … Even with Apple, Microsoft, and their likes have played an increasingly important role, their focus at this trade show was still also „classic“ home entertainment: Smart TV, home cinema, computer games. TV ist dowdy Also for 2015 the industry had set-up their things. Companies like Samsung would make clear their strategy in advance: Even more fancy TV sets with even more features. But things turned out quite differently. It seamed as if nobody wanted to watch the TV screens on this year’s CES. Classic home electronics appeared like a relict from the 70s. If not before, it became clear at CES 2015, that TV is no longer the „first screen“. Three Trends at CES2015 Three trends dominated the visitors‘ interest and the media coverage of this year’s CES: First: Connected home, in particular smoke detectors, […]

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Our Flipboard Magazine on Wearable Tech and Quantified Self

Our Flipboard Magazine on Wearable Tech and Quantified Self

So many things about wearable tech, self tracking, and the Quantified Self! So we started to put everything we read into a Flipboard Magazine to share with everyone. View my Flipboard Magazine. Looking forward to your comments!

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